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Fathers and the Law seminar at DCU postponed due to volcanic ash aviation disruption

April 19, 2010 Leave a comment

Unfortunately, the seminar on “Fatherhood, Law and Personal Life: Rethinking Debates about Fathers and Law” which was to be delivered by Professor Richard Collier at Dublin City University on this Wednesday April 21st has had to be postponed due to the current disruption in aviation caused by the cloud of volcanic ash. It will be re-arranged in the Autumn – details to follow.

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Categories: Conferences and Events Tags: ,

Reminder: Fathers and the Law Seminar at DCU

April 15, 2010 Leave a comment

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED  – THE SPEAKER IS UNABLE TO ATTEND DUE TO THE DISRUPTION TO AIRLINE SERVICES CAUSED BY THE VOLCANIC ASH CLOUD.

This is a reminder that the School of Law and Government, along with the Socio-Legal Research Centre, at Dublin City University is hosting its Inaugural Annual Law and Society Lecture at 6.30pm on Wednesday April 21st, 2010 in the Mella Carroll Lecture Theatre, Nursing Building, DCU.

The lecture, entitled “Fatherhood, Law and Personal Life: Rethinking Debates about Fathers and Law” will be delivered by Professor Richard Collier from Newcastle Law School and will be chaired by the Honorable Mrs. Justice Catherine McGuinness, President of the Law Reform Commission.

Further information is available here.

To RSVP for this event please email martina.reddy@dcu.ie

Categories: Conferences and Events Tags:

“Romeo and Juliet”: Gender discrimination law challenge rejected

March 26, 2010 2 comments

The High Court has today rejected a challenge to the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences) Act, 2006 which was based on a claim of gender discrimination. The case involved a young man, now aged 18, who had sexual intercourse with a girl of 14 when he himself was 15.

The legislation in question provides for the offences of “defilement of a child under 15 years of age” (s. 2) and “defilement of a child under 17 years of age” (s. 3). Under both of these provisions it is an offence to engage in a sexual act with a child under the relevant age. However, s. 5 of the 2006 Act states that

A female child under the age of 17 years shall not be guilty of an offence under this Act by reason only of her engaging in an act of sexual intercourse.

The claim before  the High Court was that the 2006 Act involved old-fashioned gender discrimination, which had no legitimate justification. Read more…

Passports, Industrial Action and Constitutional Rights

March 24, 2010 Leave a comment

At a meeting of the Oireachtas Committee on Foreign Affairs today, Fine Gael’s Alan Shatter T.D. suggested that recent industrial action by public service workers in the passport office may be breaching constitutional rights.

The industrial action in question has caused a backlog of over 40,000 passport applications and citizens are currently experiencing long delays in acquiring their passports. As noted by Deputy Shatter, the right of Irish citizens to travel abroad and to obtain a passport (subject to meeting the relevant requirements) was established as constitutional in nature by the Irish courts in the 1970s. In State (M) v A.G. [1979] IR 73, it was held by the High Court that Irish citizens have an unenumerated constitutional right to a passport (with certain conditions applying and other restrictions of a legal nature operating).  That particular case dealt with s.40 of the Adoption Act, 1952 which forbade the removal of certain categories of children from the State and made no allowances for exceptions to that rule.  This was found to be a breach of the recognised constitutional rights. Read more…

Inaugural Annual Law and Society Lecture at DCU: “‘Fatherhood, Law and Personal Life”

March 11, 2010 2 comments

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED  – THE SPEAKER IS UNABLE TO ATTEND DUE TO THE DISRUPTION TO AIRLINE SERVICES CAUSED BY THE VOLCANIC ASH CLOUD.

The School of Law and Government, along with the Socio-Legal Research Centre, at Dublin City University is hosting its Inaugural Annual Law and Society Lecture on Wednesday April 21st, 2010 in the Mella Carroll Lecture Theatre, Nursing Building, DCU. The lecture will begin at 6.30pm and will be followed by a reception.

 

The lecture is entitled

“Fatherhood, Law and Personal Life: Rethinking Debates about Fathers and Law”

and will be delivered by Professor Richard Collier from Newcastle Law School. The Chairperson for the evening will be the Honorable Mrs. Justice Catherine McGuinness, President of the Law Reform Commission.

 

About the Speaker

Richard Collier is Professor of Law at Newcastle University, UK. His primary research interests concern questions around law and gender, with a particular focus on issues surrounding men and masculinities, ranging from law, families and social change to legal education, crime and criminology.

His books include The ‘Man’ Of Law: Essays on Law, Men and Gender (2009),  Masculinity, Law and the Family (1995), Fragmenting Fatherhood: A Socio-Legal Study (with Sally Sheldon, 2008), Masculinities, Crime and Criminology: Men, Corporeality and the Criminal(ised) Body (1998) and Fathers’ Rights Activism and Law Reform in Comparative Perspective (edited with Sally Sheldon, 2007). Richard is an Editorial Board member of Social and Legal Studies.

Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission issue Report on the Death of Terence Wheelock

March 10, 2010 5 comments

The Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission (GSOC), established in May 2007, has today issued its first report carried out under s.102(4) of the Garda Síochána Act 2005. This provision allows for GSOC to initiate an investigation, without receiving a specific complaint, if it appears that a member of An Garda Síochána may have committed an offence or behaved in a manner that would justify disciplinary proceedings, and such an investigation seems “desirable in the public interest”.  This first report is based on an investigation into the death of Mr. Terence Wheelock on September 16, 2005, following a period of detention at Store Street garda station (Report: Press Release). Terence Wheelock was arrested on June 2, 2005 and was found, later that same day, unconscious in a cell at Store Street garda station. He never regained consciousness and died at the Mater Hospital on September 16, 2005.

The GSOC investigation, which began in July 2007, set out to establish whether or not any act or omission of any member of An Garda Síochána caused the death of or serious harm to Terence Wheelock. Prior to the GSOC investigation, an internal Garda inquiry into the matter was carried out and an inquest found (with a jury verdict of 4:3) that Mr. Wheelock had died as a result of suicide by hanging. Read more…

Categories: Policing Tags:

Irish Government should “Come Clean” on Initial Findings of Torture Committee

February 10, 2010 1 comment

 

The Irish Penal Reform Trust (IPRT) and the Irish Council for Civil Liberties (ICCL) have this morning called on the Irish government to publish the initial findings of the European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (CPT) which visited Ireland, for the fifth time, from January 25th-February 5th. Preliminary observations were presented by the CPT to the Irish authorities following their review of conditions of detention in prisons, safeguards in place in Garda stations, conditions in psychiatric institutions and an establishment for the intellectually disabled.

Director of the ICCL, Mark Kelly, called on the government to release the findings and to

come clean about the parlous state of our custody centres…

Executive Director of the IPRT, Liam Herrick, believes that the CPT’s preliminary findings will have documented the inadequate progress made by the Irish government in relation to tackling overcrowding in our prisons, the practice of “slopping out” and other related matters.

The press release is available here. Information on the CPT’s previous visits to Ireland and previous responses from the Irish government are available here.